12/31/2006

A short walk in the small city garden

Always a work in progress, but I finished the cobblestone path a few days ago. I'm holding the camera at waist-level.



Come back in the spring and summer, and maybe we'll do this again.

I'm surprised how long it takes YouTube to "process" a video after it's been uploaded. This one didn't become available until three hours after I finished the upload! Apparently patience is a virtue...and not just in gardening.

10 comments:

Christopher C. in Hawaii said...

Bravo to you too! What fun. Now we just need a little narration for the short walk in a small city garden.

I see you went around your Geranium maderense. I thought you were going to take it out maybe.

chuck b. said...

I'm going to let G. maderense flower and die. I'm actually fond of that plant, although I like it better in a full-sun exposure. It gets leggy in the shade! I don't know if it's going to self sow or not (being the only one around that I know of; maybe it won't make viable seed), but I would be happy if it did. I could tuck a couple of 'em in different places...

Besides, pulling it out would deprive me of the very bloggable inflorescence. Which is pretty, but smells quite bad, imo.

chuck b. said...

And, I'll definitely do some narration when there's something to talk about. Right now everything feels so blah. I can hardly stand it.

And maybe it was too high-res a camera setting or something (sure didn't seem high res, did it?), but that little 47 second vid was very close to the maximum 100MB file size allowable by YouTube. So they will be short narratives.

nina said...

Yours may be the first that I actually play. (I have vowed to not go beyond reading blogs.)
Can you send some of those green colors here, to the brown Midwest? I miss snow or green things or both.

Annie in Austin said...

Thank you for the video, Chuck B, and Happy New Year! I like the path - it's just wide enough to step on, gently forcing the visitor to be intimately involved with the garden, rather than remaining a detached observer.

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

chuck b. said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
chuck b. said...

That's the idea, Annie. It's a one-man path with an uneven surface that forces the visitor to walk slowly. There's a place on the other side of the garden for gatherings. And I have plans for two places to stop and sit along the cobblestone path. Won't get to them until this summer probably.

Some of the plants come a little too far into the path right now, but that's okay. One is a tree fern. Some day its fronds will be overhead instead of waist-high. Right now it's a waiting game. G. maderense will flower and die and I'll have to put something else there (not sure what). And I'll remove the Echium candicans this fall and replace it with Eriogonum arborescens which I'm currently growing from seed.

Coreopsis gigantea is the big question mark. Far too weird to ever part with, but I don't know what i'll do if it turns out to crowd the path too severely. Along the sides of the path, I'm going with wildflowers and small native buckwheats. And a sweet pea here and there.

Jenn said...

How sweet!

I love the feel of the small 'pocket' garden, takes me back to reading Hodges 'The Secret Garden' as a child (although I doubt that garden was small.)

Your blue troughs are mighty succulent! HA, couldn't resist - that's a fabulous color and set up you have there, very nice.

lisa said...

Great job!

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