7/14/2007

Today at the San Franicsco Botanical Garden

It looked like this.

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I'm in a new structure being built in the rhododendron dell using some of William Randolph Heart's old monastery stones.

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The tree is Luma apiculata in the Myrtaceae, from Chile. It's considered a water-wise plant for Bay Area gardens. The foliage is fragrant, and the tree has white flowers later in the summer, followed by large berries.

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Acanthus mollis, Acanthaceae.

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I'm told this plant is ineradicable once established in a San Francisco garden. I have no experience with it myself.

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The thorny tree.

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This is its foliage.

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I want love this conifer.

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Pelargonium sidoides.

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Really nice idea.

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Cercidiphyllum japonicum 'Heronswood Globe'. Cercidiphyllaceae. This plant smells remarkably like burnt sugar.

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Anigozanthos sp., Haemodoraceae.
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I might have to rethink my feelings about this plant. Before, I was, like, "It's the new Agapanthus." Sunset says it's native to open Eucalyptus forests. That must be something to see. Here, nothing grows under Eucalyptus.

Far too rampant for the small garden, but I like Salvia cacaliifolia.

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The triangular leaves get me.

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Even more rampant, Solandra sp., Solanaceae.

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Fuchsia boliviana v. Alba.

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Encephelartos and yellow clivia.

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Encephalartos tegulaneus, a cycad.

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Strelitzia and agapanthus. Plants of the idealized suburban California garden of the 1970s.

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Dierama pulcherrimum, Iridaceae.

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I have seeds for this plant. Must. Sow. Them. Soon.

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Protea. Part plant, part bird.

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I sometimes feel like I should have plants like these in my garden, just because I could grow them here. And I like them. I think they're just too big for me. That's often what it comes down to.

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Cercis occidentalis.

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The western redbud is more twisty-shrubby than the eastern varieties.

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We're in the California section now.

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Eriogonum grande v. rubescens and Clarkia sp.

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Eriogonum arborescens, Polygonaceae.

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Right on the cusp of bloom.

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Asclepias speciosa, Asclepiadaceae.

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This is one of the few plants left that I really, really want in my garden.

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This pink Mimulus aurantiacus (Scrophulariaceae) was growing in an inaccessible spot so I had to zoom in on it.

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Toxicodendron diversilobum, Anacardiaceae. Related to mango!

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Populus tremuloides, Salicaceae. Quaking Aspen. I would grow this too if I could. The plant gets turned on by the slightest breeze, and it's so important to have some movement in the garden, in my opinion.

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Currants.

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This is a Keckiella; I'm not sure which one. I'm growing K. cordifolia from seed.

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Calycanthus.

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Allium.

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And some yarrow.

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Acer circinatum.

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Okay, we're leaving California now.

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I don't know what got into this Echium...

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This is Francoa. There are a few different kinds, and I don't know which is which.

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Senna condolliana, Fabaceae.

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Remnant puya flowers up there.

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A closer look from the other side.

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Hmm. I didn't get a picture of the tree, but here is the flower of Chiranthodendron pentadactylon, Sterculiaceae.

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They're having a plant sale today. I'm not working it or shopping it, so by the time I get here everything's pretty picked over.

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But we can look around!

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They're pushing the passion flowers.

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Many, many kinds.

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There's that Gunnera.

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They're selling these Madia I grew from seed. Someone told me a guy bought four of them this morning.

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I should have bought these pitchers.

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And this Prunella vulgaris.

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Isn't it pretty?

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A little behind the scenes tour.

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Allium flavum 'minus'. What a name.

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Sweet swallowtail.

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13 comments:

Digital Flower Pictures said...

It looks like you had a nice trip around the Botanical Garden. Is there anything that doesn't grow out there? ;-)

chuck b. said...

Well, the list of what we can grow is probably longer than the list of what we can't grow, but of course I really want everything we can't grow. Melons, eggplant, beefsteak tomatoes, apricots, and peaches, for starters.

Pam said...

Wow! I'm speechless. So much to look at.

Those monastery stones are gorgeous. And the Acanthus - it's like a field of Acanthus in bloom! I don't think that I've ever seen anything like that before.

Thanks.

LostRoses said...

I'm constantly amazed at the variety of plants that will grow there. I think you should put one of those proteas in your garden, it's very cool and you can have one big plant, can't you?

I have to say I'm sickened by that thorny-trunked tree. It looks like a skin disease, don't you think?

JvA said...

Nice!

Have you been to Hearst Castle? I went there several years ago, but I wasn't into plants at the time. Do they have cool plants?

Blackswamp_Girl said...

That's the bane of small gardens... so many things you can't grow for lack of space. *sigh*

I loved those pictures, though. And I'm going out and putting some of my small creeping sedum around my black mondo grass--maybe that will help it stand out a bit more like it does in your picture.

chuck b. said...

Lost Roses, I do have big plants in the garden right now, they're just small still. But they'll get big. Adding even one more big plant would be overwhelming. The thorny tree doesn't really bother me too, but I see where you're coming from.

Julie, I've never been to Hearst Castle. We have that in the queue as a possible roadtrip.

Kim, I really like that silver-gray/black combination. Last year, a woman (from Ohio I think) won the Fine Gardening container contest using black and white and silver-gray foliage. (Begonias mostly.) It was lovely.

lisa said...

Great tour, as usual! That luma tree has it all-nice bark, frag. foliage, flowers AND berries! Wow! I liked that grey/black combo, too, and that dierama-yes. plant. soon! :) As for the protea-will it do okay in a pot? Would that help it stay smaller? I like that you want milkweed, and it's something I have TONS of-want seeds? The pitcher plants are way cool...and I can't believe you're admiring prunella vulgaris, I have plenty and it's actually rather invasive! (Heh...want seeds?)

lisa said...

Great shot of the butterfly, BTW!

chuck b. said...

You don't like Prunella? Really?! It's sure not very weedy here; I never see it anywhere. (Weedy natives would be nice.) I would love some seeds! Yes, please!

Are your sure your milkweed is Asclepias speciosa? If you're sure, I would love some seeds of that too! That would be awesome!

You can e-mail me at lcbii@yahoo.com and we'll make arrangements...

lisa said...

I am sure about the milkweed, and I will be happy to hook you up!

chuck b. said...

Thanks, Lisa!

What seeds can I share with you? You probably have everything in the world!

Would you like to try some Madia, or Cammissonia? (The latter as an annual in your climate; the Madia is an annual anyway.) Something else? How about some 'apricot beauty' foxglove?

lisa said...

Sure! How about some Madia and Foxglove? Hey and if you want to try some daylilies, I'd be happy to slide you a couple divisions!